Articles Posted in General Defense Info

You have been accused of stalking. You are probably quite understandably upset, worried and maybe even angry. In most of these cases the two parties know each other. You may have been completely unaware that the other person was upset by your presence or communication. You are worried what this will mean to your future.  Commonly, this is a former intimate partner or relationship making this a domestic violence allegation.

Stalking is charged when you are suspected of repeatedly following another person who is afraid or intimidated by this and you know (or should have known) that they felt fearful. Please notice that you do not need to intend to frighten the other person for this crime to be charged; it simply matters that they felt threatened. This is generally a gross misdemeanor charge with penalties of up to a year in jail and a $5000 fine. But, there are situations which can increase this to a felony charge with penalties of up to 5 years in jail a $10,000 fine. This increase happens when you have a past conviction of stalking or there is a restraining order in place or you are suspected of trying to intimidate a witness in another case. So this is very serious. Also, if this is a domestic violence situation then the probation, even on the misdemeanor, can be five years long.  That is what you need to know and that is why you need a defense attorney. Continue reading

You are facing robbery charges. You are understandably upset and worried about what that may mean to your future – both immediate and long term. Your family may be upset with you. You are upset with yourself for getting into this situation. You may feel all alone. You do not need to be and, in fact, you should not be. You need a defense attorney on your side.

Theft, in and of itself, is a serious charge. But robbery gets even more serious. It is like being charged with theft and a violent crime at the same time. Robbery has two possible degrees you could be charged with. Second degree is charged when you are accused of taking property from someone else by threatening them harm or intimidating them. This is a class B felony and has penalties of up to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $20,000. That is serious enough but first degree is even more serious. First degree robbery is charged in the event of four possible situations: you were armed, or you showed a weapon, or the victim suffered bodily harm, or the robbery was done at a bank or financial institution. Of course any combination of these suspected scenarios would also lead to a first degree robbery charge. This is now classified as a class A felony which is on the same level as murder in the first degree; you could be facing life in prison and a fine of up to $50,000. That is the bad news and is why you want and need a defense attorney on your side. Continue reading

Are you facing a weapons charge? In Washington there are many possible weapons charges and they are all taken seriously. They can stand by themselves, such as illegal possession of a firearm, or they can be in conjunction with another criminal charge, as is the case with armed robbery. You’re understandably concerned what this will mean to your future. You are possibly upset and thinking, “Don’t I have the right to bear arms in this country?” That right does exist and Washington does uphold it but they have placed certain legal restrictions on that right.

As mentioned there are a wide variety of possible gun crimes but they fit into a few categories. The first category of weapons charges is if a gun is used to commit a crime – this can result in harsher sentencing. This is because Washington has in its laws what it calls weapons enhancers. This means that you can get sentenced for a crime and then extra time added if there was a weapon involved. Almost anything that could potentially cause harm can be raised by the prosecution as a weapon whether it was a gun, knife or even a baseball bat. They will then probably ask for a weapons enhancer to be attached. If the weapon was a gun it is rather difficult to claim it was anything other than a weapon – in fact firearms have a longer enhancement than any other weapon. The extra time will be added to the end of whatever other sentence is faced and will not be able to be reduced. There are, in fact, people who have spent more time in jail due to the weapons enhancement than they were sentenced for the actual crime. Continue reading

It might seem like a no-brainer to say but if you are facing criminal charges you will want to seriously consider any and all advice given to you by your defense attorney. Of course if something doesn’t make sense you will want to ask questions but deliberate over the answer given. Remember that there are years of legal experience going into any advice given and that is why you got a defense attorney in the first place. One area in which defendants sometimes choose not to take their defense attorney’s advice is when it comes to accepting the testimony or consultation of an expert witness. You may be wondering, “Why would anyone refuse to do that?” It is because expert witnesses are not free. Sometimes their fees can get up into the thousands of dollars. Perhaps, in your case, an expert witness would be a good idea. If so, you will be presented with the idea and the potential cost by your defense attorney. At that point, and probably due to the cost, you may think about turning down the idea too. So, it is a good idea to know what an expert witness can potentially do for you.

One thing they can do for you is provide information for your defense attorney. Your defense attorney is an expert on the law – that is why you will want to consider carefully all he says about your case. However, that does not mean he is also an expert in medicine, toxicology, mechanics, or any other specialized field. If he is seeking the information from an expert witness it means that your defense attorney believes the information could be useful. If he thinks so, it is well worth thinking about. Continue reading

Have you missed a court date? And you are now worrying how that’s going to affect you? Or have you already been charged with bail jumping or failure to appear? In Washington this is taken very seriously and does have some harsh penalties. Things do come up in life. We know that. You may very well have a legitimate reason to have missed your court date. You will want to get your story heard.

Bail jumping or failure to appear is charged when, for whatever reason, you missed a scheduled court hearing of which you were notified. The penalties depend on the severity of the original crime with which you had been charged.  If you were charged with a misdemeanor the potential penalties are up to 1 year in jail and a fine up to $5000. If you were charged with a class B or C felony, Then bail jumping is also a class C Felony (maximum of 5 years in prison and $10,000.00 fine).  If you were charged with a class A felony, the bail jump is a class B Felony (a maximum of 10 years in jail and a fine up to $20,000).  Lastly, if you allegedly bail jumped while facing a Murder charge then the Bail Jump itself is a class A felony.  

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You’re being either accused of DUI or are under investigation for a crime. Perhaps you’ve even had to go through the stress of arrest and arraignment. This is the most stress you’ve probably ever been under. You’re worried. Your family is worried. Your friends are worried. Everyone is saying, “Get a lawyer.” You want to follow this advice. You realize that a defense attorney on your side would be a good idea to have. But the task is daunting. There are several attorneys in the area and you have no idea how to choose one. Most of this will be what you will want to consider no matter what the crime is that you’re under suspicion of.

There are a few things to consider. These may sound fairly obvious, but you’re in a situation where the obvious doesn’t always feel so obvious. Continue reading

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